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How to make eco-friendly beeswax wraps so you can ditch plastic wrap forever

There are numerous ways we can improve our kindness to the planet and with lots of emphasis on our environmental impact in today's society, you might be wondering where to get started. From avoiding buying plastic water bottles to using a reusable grocery bag, small life changes can go a long way. Eco Expert Candice Batista showed us how to make beeswax wraps so you can eliminate all the saran wrap and plastic baggies that are stored in your kitchen. With just a few simple steps, your family can take one step forward in making your home a more environmentally-friendly atmosphere!

STEP 1: GATHER OLD FABRIC

The first step in creating beeswax wraps is to source old fabrics from around your house. Cotton typically works the best, which also the easiest fabric to find in your home. Pillowcases, sheets and old t-shirts can all be used for this! If you don’t have any that you’re willing to repurpose, check with your neighbours or friends to see if they’re getting rid of old fabric rather than buying it.

STEP 2: CUT YOUR FABRIC

Having a selection of sizes is always a good idea as you likely use different shaped dishes for storing food. While square wraps are good for most food items, we recommend cutting a few round pieces too for jars and bowls. A few common sizes that you can use as guidelines are:

  • Small Wrap: 18 cm x 18 cm (7" x 7")
  • Medium Wrap: 25 cm x 25 cm (10" x 10")
  • Large Wrap: 33 cm x 33 cm (13" x 13")

STEP 3: LAY THE FABRIC ON A BAKING SHEET

Once you’ve cut your fabric into the sizes and shapes that work best for your daily use, lay the fabric onto a baking sheet. Make sure to place parchment paper both on the top and bottom between the fabric!

STEP 4: PLACE THE BEESWAX ONTO THE FABRIC

One of the most important parts of this DIY is to evenly spread the beeswax onto the fabric. Double-check for any clumps or bulges and smooth things out before you continue to the final step!

STEP 5: IRON

For the final step, set your iron to the wool setting so that it doesn't get too hot. Place the iron onto your parchment paper and press down with light pressure. As you do this, you'll notice the wax starting to melt. You can continue to move the iron around to spread the beeswax around. When it looks even, remove the top layer of parchment paper slowly. If there's any excess wax, evenly brush it across. 

Once you're done, you can use your wraps to cover bowls, mason jars, leftover fruits and anything else you can think of! 

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